Untitled Document
Brown Columbia Cornell Dartmouth Harvard Penn Princeton Yale



 Page 3 of 3 ALL« First<123
Username Post: Boudreaux transferring        (Topic#20655)
somedartmouthstudent2 
Freshman
Posts: 19

Age: 22
Reg: 02-21-18
Re: Boudreaux transferring
04-04-18 11:17 PM - Post#254812    
    In response to Go Green

I think judging the decision making process of a 19/20 year old without knowing any of the details is an exercise in futility. Condemning said player for acting in self interest is also fairly petty.

Call it what you may, but you can be a Dartmouth fan and still support what Boudreaux did. I know I'm excited to follow him as he plays in an infinitely better conference.

Its like beating a dead horse at this point. Move on.

 
PennFan10 
PhD Student
Posts: 1992

Reg: 02-15-15
04-04-18 11:25 PM - Post#254813    
    In response to somedartmouthstudent2

we actually know a lot of the details. But point taken, it’s time to move on.....

 
Go Green 
Masters Student
Posts: 456

Age: 47
Reg: 04-22-10
Re: Boudreaux transferring
04-05-18 05:09 AM - Post#254814    
    In response to somedartmouthstudent2

  • somedartmouthstudent2 Said:


Call it what you may, but you can be a Dartmouth fan and still support what Boudreaux did. I know I'm excited to follow him as he plays in an infinitely better conference.





No disrespect, but I think you may be in the minority here.

Imagine Tracey McSorley arriving in camp, taking all the first-team reps, and then announcing the day before the opener that he is going to sit out the season and take a graduate transfer. I can't imagine that going over well in Happy Valley...

That's pretty much what happened here.

 
somedartmouthstudent2 
Freshman
Posts: 19

Age: 22
Reg: 02-21-18
04-05-18 09:18 AM - Post#254822    
    In response to PennFan10

Do you though? As far as I know neither Boudreaux or any of the coaches have come out and spoken about it. It is literally all conjecture. As someone who worked with the team it is mind blowing we are having this conversation a full year later.


I get your perspective, but I also think you greatly overestimate how many people care about Dartmouth hoops.

 
Go Green 
Masters Student
Posts: 456

Age: 47
Reg: 04-22-10
04-05-18 10:00 AM - Post#254824    
    In response to somedartmouthstudent2

  • somedartmouthstudent2 Said:
As someone who worked with the team it is mind blowing we are having this conversation a full year later.



This is kind of my point.

If it was a full year later, we wouldn't be discussing it. Had Bourdreaux left in April 2017, people would have been bummed, but understanding.

But it hasn't been a full year, has it? He left the day before the 2017-18 season opener.

Big difference.

 
jadwinjungle 
Freshman
Posts: 45

Age: 20
Reg: 10-02-17
04-05-18 10:17 AM - Post#254825    
    In response to Go Green

Do we know for sure that he literally decided the day before the season started? It seems to me that the day before the opener has traditionally been the day Ivy teams wait to drop some of their big news. This year alone, along with Boudreaux's transfer news, Yale announced Bruner and Mason were out indefinitely the day before the season opener. In previous years things like Hans Brase's injury, and Siyani Chambers' injury weren't announced until very close to the season opener. I doubt they literally just found out the day before, but they probably waited to announce for some reason. Is it possible that Boudreaux and the coaching staff simply waited until the day before the opener to make the announcement, but the decision was made before that?

 
mrjames 
Professor
Posts: 5324

Loc: Montclair, NJ
Reg: 11-21-04
04-05-18 11:09 AM - Post#254829    
    In response to jadwinjungle

All of that news happened right before the season started. The Yale injuries were during the scrimmage timeframe, so the news was held a week or so before getting out there. The Evan stuff happened right before the season as well - though again, maybe there was a bit of a delay in the news getting out.

Neither happened, say, over the summer and was held until the fall or anything like that...

 
Go Green 
Masters Student
Posts: 456

Age: 47
Reg: 04-22-10
04-05-18 01:20 PM - Post#254846    
    In response to jadwinjungle

  • jadwinjungle Said:
Do we know for sure that he literally decided the day before the season started?



Fair enough.

That being said, he was in the team photo-which usually gets taken pretty close to the start of the season. They either re-took the photo or digitally edited him out of it.

 
PennFan10 
PhD Student
Posts: 1992

Reg: 02-15-15
04-05-18 08:41 PM - Post#254856    
    In response to somedartmouthstudent2

  • somedartmouthstudent2 Said:
Do you though? As far as I know neither Boudreaux or any of the coaches have come out and spoken about it. It is literally all conjecture. As someone who worked with the team it is mind blowing we are having this conversation a full year later.


I get your perspective, but I also think you greatly overestimate how many people care about Dartmouth hoops.



While I have never spoken to Evan personally, my posts on this are not conjecture but based on what I consider to be very reliable sources. I stand by my comments


 
somedartmouthstudent2 
Freshman
Posts: 19

Age: 22
Reg: 02-21-18
04-05-18 10:30 PM - Post#254858    
    In response to PennFan10

Well, I'll just say consider the perspective of your sources. I've been around the team for almost 4 years now and almost all of it is conjecture.

 
rbg 
PhD Student
Posts: 1050

Reg: 10-20-14
07-12-18 07:56 AM - Post#258728    
    In response to somedartmouthstudent2

Here's a Chicago Tribune article on Boudreaux's start at Purdue:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/post-tribune...

 
GoBigGreenBasketball 
Masters Student
Posts: 566

Age: 46
Reg: 05-19-16
07-12-18 08:08 AM - Post#258734    
    In response to rbg

Great read. Thanks for posting.
"...no excuses - only results!”


 
GoBigGreenBasketball 
Masters Student
Posts: 566

Age: 46
Reg: 05-19-16
Ivy league degree in hand, Boudreaux is prepping for a new challenge..
10-18-18 07:41 AM - Post#262922    
    In response to rbg

Ivy League degree in hand Boudreaux is prepping for a new challenge at purdue

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Evan Boudreaux speaks about Purdue the way a recently promoted minor-league lifer talks about the majors.

Boudreaux, a 6-foot-8 star at Dartmouth for two seasons, hasn’t even played a game with the Boilermakers, hasn’t been on a chartered flight for a road game, hasn’t seen Mackey Arena when it’s packed and rocking. But in the small details he has seen since he arrived on campus in June, he can sense the differences between life in the Big Ten and the Ivy League.

“You look at the commitment from the school, it’s just above and beyond,” Boudreaux says as he sits in a posh club room in Mackey. “A lot of it is little things. Stuff with food and schedules. They seem small to the average person, but to an athlete whose days are commanded by commitments, being able to go after practice and having training table food ready for you. We didn’t always have that at Dartmouth, and a lot of those little things add up. It trickles down. You see it when you step on the floor at practice. Even when it’s empty, it gives a different kind of vibe.”

However, Boudreaux also understands better than most that the Ivy League and the bush leagues are not the same. He knows he can count on the sociology degree he obtained in three years at Dartmouth to set him up for the sort of post-basketball career opportunities he could only dream of were he transferring up from another mid-major conference.

That’s because he’s a Dartmouth legacy. His mother, Gail, a 1982 graduate, was a three-time All-American and Ivy League Player of the Year in basketball and a four-time Ivy League shot put champion. She is now the president and CEO of Anthem, the Indianapolis-based insurance company that ranks No. 29 in total revenue on the Fortune 500 list, and she is on Dartmouth’s Board of Trustees. His brother, Chris, also graduated from Dartmouth, playing tight end on the football team for one season. He’s now an assistant business development manager for Castlight, a San Francisco-based internet company that helps people understand their health insurance options.

Evan wants to be a CEO himself, and he knows he’ll have a clearer path to that goal than most. “I had grown up around Dartmouth,” he says. “I knew the weight of a Dartmouth education. Our alumni network is unbelievable. There’s only three, four thousand people there, right? I would go to an airport wearing a Dartmouth T-shirt. I’d get stopped multiple times by someone saying, ‘Oh, are you a Dartmouth grad?’ Stuff like that. So many people who went to Dartmouth want to hire Dartmouth grads. They just try to keep everything in such a tight community. The connections you get are unbelievable. It’s hard to beat.”

When he made his college commitment, Boudreaux had to decide whether that education and those connections were worth passing on the opportunity to prove doubters wrong by playing in a power-5 conference. He concluded that Dartmouth was too good to pass up.

After two seasons, however, he had lost more than twice as many games (38) as he’d won (17). He saw the opportunity to have it all — the Ivy League degree and two years of big-league basketball — so he went for it. But first, he had to spend one very awkward season in Hanover, N.H., as a man without a team.

Dickey Simpkins first laid eyes on Boudreaux when the young forward was in the sixth grade. Simpkins, who starred as a big man at Providence and won three NBA championships with the Chicago Bulls in the late ’90s, had started a grassroots program in the Chicago suburbs called Next Level Performance and was working as a consultant at Lake Forest Academy, where Chris was playing. Terry Boudreaux wanted Simpkins to work with his younger son.

After about a 15-minute workout, Simpkins was sold. Evan was tall for his age, but he didn’t seem as hampered by the typical early-adolescent awkwardness. He could handle the ball and shoot it, and he was a quick learner.

“He was a confident kid in the sixth grade and very skilled for his grade as a player as tall as he was,” Simpkins recalls. “His shooting mechanics and technique were very good for a sixth grader his size. I showed him some post-move shots, jump hooks, left-handed and right-handed, and some footwork that he picked up on the spot.”

Boudreaux was a ferocious, gritty competitor. He had a privileged upbringing as the son of two health-care executives, and he grew up in Lake Forest, one of the more affluent communities in the country. Terry and Gail, however, were college athletes (Terry played lacrosse at Georgia) from much more modest backgrounds. They knew what it took to achieve what they did, and they demanded the same from their sons.

“They came from really humble beginnings,” Evan says. “They paid their way through college. They paid off their student debts and they built an incredible life for my brother and I, and even though we’ve been really blessed with their success, from Day One if we weren’t giving effort and we weren’t showing that we were 100 percent invested in what we were doing, there was a very stern talking to. There’s no excuse for not giving effort. They always said, ‘You don’t have to play a sport if you don’t want to, but if you’re going to be doing something, you’re going to give 100 percent.'”

Evan usually did, and he built a reputation as a kid who could play through pain. He suffered a gruesome break in his nose while playing for Simpkins’ 16 and under NLP team in the semifinals of the 2012 AAU National Championships in Orlando. Boudreaux’s nose was sideways and plugs were needed to stop the bleeding, but he returned to the game and later played in nationals. He also played through his senior year with a fractured right wrist that fired pain through his arm every time he flicked a shot.

“Evan was one of the most intense practice guys we ever had,” says Phil LaScala, who coached Boudreaux at Lake Forest High School. “If you didn’t know that his family had money, you would never know. He’s a blue-collar guy when he plays basketball. Everything that he did, he showed a lot of determination and hard work.”

He used those qualities to develop into one of the best players in the Chicago area. As a senior, he was second in the state in scoring (24.8 points per game) and rebounding (13.6). He finished as Lake Forest’s all-time leading scorer, with 2,076 career points, and he had the seventh-most rebounds in state history, with 1,296. He could shoot from outside, take opponents to the hole off the dribble, finish on the pick and roll and score out of post-ups. He had a nose for rebounds, and he could defend on the perimeter and in the post.

Also, his teams won. He helped Simpkins’ NLP team — which included future college stars Jevon Carter (West Virginia) and Jalen Brunson (Villanova) — to a runner-up finish in that AAU national tournament. In his senior year in 2015, Lake Forest reached the sectional finals of the state tournament before losing to Brunson’s Lincolnshire Stevenson team, which would win the Class 4A state title.

But as impressed as college coaches were with Boudreaux’s skill set, there were still concerns. In front-court players, they wanted someone who was taller than the 6-foot-8 Boudreaux, had a wider body than the 220-pounder or had a higher vertical than his 34-inch leap.

“College coaches get paid to recruit players that can help them win and normally they’re looking at what you would consider the sexy players,” Simpkins says. “Evan and Jevon Carter were never the sexy players. They were the players that were grimy and got their work done.”

Says Boudreaux: “I was always asking, ‘What more do you want to see?’ I think some coaches wanted me to be 6-9, and I think they were waiting on that. They were like, ‘Well, if he was 6-9, we’d take him in an instant, but he’s not.’ I was like, ‘Well, there’s nothing I can do about that.’ At the same time, I’m putting up some of the best numbers in the state and playing against some of the best competition in the country and performing. That was frustrating for me knowing I was competing at a high level with those guys, some of the top players in the country, and coaches were still like, ‘Oh, yeah, but he’s only 6-7 or 6-8.'”

Boudreaux still got high-major scholarship offers, just not from powerhouse programs. Iowa, Iowa State, Penn State, Northwestern and Boston College all reportedly made offers, but several programs, Purdue among them, never pulled the trigger, staying in contact with him while hoping they could lure more highly regarded players.

The notion of playing in the Big Ten to make the point that he belonged was tempting, and Iowa was in Boudreaux’s top three when he trimmed his list, but Dartmouth provided the education he wanted, the immediate playing time he desired and a chance to make history. The Big Green played in the NCAA title game twice in the 1940s but hadn’t been in the tournament since 1959.

“I saw it as an opportunity because they hadn’t been successful,” Boudreaux says. “I saw it as, ‘Well, my class is going to be the class to take them back. My class, we’re going to bring them back to win the Ivy League for the first time in 50 years.’ Think about how special that would be for the town, the school, everything.”

After two rough seasons, however, Boudreaux came to accept that his class couldn’t save Dartmouth basketball, and he started to wonder if he could get an Ivy League degree and then play high-major basketball.

Boudreaux established himself as Dartmouth’s best player from his first game, scoring 25 points in the Big Green’s 2015-16 opener against Seton Hall. He finished second in the conference in scoring (17.7 points) and third in rebounding (9.4) to earn Ivy League Freshman of the Year honors. In league play, he averaged a double-double with 20.2 points and a conference-best 10.2 rebounds per game.

But even with all of that scoring and rebounding the Big Green won only 10 games, and that wasn’t enough for coach Paul Cormier to save his job. Dartmouth had posted double-digit victories in three straight seasons for the first time since 1994 to ’97, but Cormier was only 55-116 in his six seasons.


As a freshman at Dartmouth, Boudreaux was a double-double machine. (David Dennis/Icon Sportswire/Corbis via Getty Images)
Dave McLaughlin, who had been the associate head coach at Northeastern, was hired, but things got worse. As a sophomore, Boudreaux finished second in the Ivy in scoring (17.5 points) and led the league in rebounding (9.5). Dartmouth finished 7-20.

Boudreaux didn’t start considering a transfer until he returned to campus for the 2017-18 school year, and he realized then that he had accumulated enough credits that if he accelerated his pace a little he could finish his degree by June.

The losing was apparently only part of the reason behind the decision to start over, but Boudreaux declined to go into further detail. “I didn’t even consider it until last fall,” he says. “Some things happened. I looked at my course load and realized I was ahead of the curve.”

Dartmouth didn’t want to get into it either. McLaughlin responded to an interview request from The Athletic with a statement. “We wish Evan the best of luck at Purdue,” McLaughlin said. “Dartmouth is a special place, and we are very happy that he was able to complete his undergraduate degree during his time here.”

Of course, for Boudreaux, getting his degree instead of transferring immediately meant staying on campus, unlike players who spend their transfer year working out with their new team. Once he declared his intention to transfer, he couldn’t work out with Dartmouth. He had to prepare for a higher level of basketball than he had ever played without a coach, teammates or a dedicated support staff.

“That was difficult at first,” Simpkins says. “But once we got on the phone — his dad, myself and Evan — and discussed the plan and put the plan in play, he got into a nice routine.”

Boudreaux hired a strength trainer to push him in the weight room, and without a season’s worth of running up and down the floor, he made more gains in that area than he ever had. He trained on the courts available to the student body. His fraternity brothers at Gamma Delta Chi, many of whom played on the football team, played pick-up games with him and participated in his workouts however he needed them

“It allowed me to not just shoot around but do full-speed stuff work on shooting over guys, playing with bigger guys, playing with 300-pound linemen,” Boudreaux says. “I didn’t have a team, so that was huge.”

The one issue Boudreaux couldn’t game-plan for was the effect of leaving a team without leaving a school. His decision frayed relationships with several of the players he had spent the previous two years with, and Dartmouth isn’t the sort of campus where it’s easy to get lost and avoid people.

“I’d be lying if I said there weren’t some hard feelings,” Boudreaux says. “It was tough. You see them everywhere. It’s a small school. It’s not like a place where there’s 40,000 kids. You see a lot of people often. I tried to explain that it wasn’t personal. I had had some differences, and I wanted to do what was best for me. At the end of the day, you hope they understand, but sometimes there’s not a ton you can do. I still talk to a couple (teammates). From their standpoint, it’s tough when you have one of the players you’re counting on leave. I get it. I don’t hold any resentment or animosity toward them. I’m still rooting for them. I hope they have a great year.”

Boudreax followed Dartmouth games but didn’t attend any because he was concerned about the effect his presence would have. Things didn’t get any better for the Big Green. They finished 7-20 again.

Not being a part of a team for the winter for the first time in more than a decade ate at him, but it ultimately allowed him both to drill down on his academic work to finish his degree and to improve himself physically.

“I felt so much more explosive,” Boudreaux says. “I felt so much more athletic. All of my weightlifting numbers went through the roof. Just having a whole five months to say, ‘We’re going to lift. We’re going to get better at this, this and this. Still working out hard, but not necessarily the grind of playing 40 minutes every couple of nights. That five or six months was really good for my body.”

And that gave him even more to sell to programs who had passed on him the first time.

Boudreaux’s recruitment as a grad transfer was essentially the opposite of his experience in high school. With 65 3-pointers in two seasons, he had proven he could shoot from the perimeter and also showed he could rebound while playing inside and outside. He also had two years of eligibility remaining, making him even more attractive on the transfer market.

“When Evan decided to transfer and it hit the wire, I got a call from every conference,” Simpkins says. “Big 12, Pac-12, ACC, Big East, every conference. My phone was blowing up.”

Xavier and Purdue jumped in immediately. Boudreaux committed to Xavier last December, only to see coach Chris Mack leave for the Louisville job in March.

Boudreaux believed Purdue had been honest with him all along, even when the Boilermakers chose not to offer him a scholarship as a high schooler, so he trusted them when they made it clear he would be a big part of their plans. “Purdue was one of those schools that was never going to lie to me,” Boudreaux says. “I knew that. They would always tell me exactly what they thought. This is what we think you need to get better at. This is what we’re doing and what our class is looking like right now. For me, I appreciate the honesty. They were trying to figure out scholarships for Caleb Swanigan and some of their other guys. They were like, ‘We don’t want to offer you because we might get a McDonald’s All-American.’ I was like, ‘Look, I get that. There’s no hard feelings there.’ When I got into the process the second time, they called me and they were like, ‘We really want you.’ They were honest with me again. They were like, ‘We’re looking at other fours, too, but we want you.'”

The Boilermakers have a lot of production they need to replace. They may have the nation’s best returning shooting guard in Carsen Edwards, but they lost their other four starters, including center Isaac Haas and wing Dakota Mathias. Matt Haarms, a 7-foot-3, 249-pound sophomore, gives them a replacement for Haas in the middle, but Boudreaux gives them versatility and experience they wouldn’t have otherwise. He can’t protect the rim like Haarms can, but he can defend all five positions, and he creates mismatch problems at both power forward and center.

“Evan puts in a lot of time,” Matt Painter says. “He’s very competitive, he’s rebounded well. He can make 3s, so he can stretch big guys out. He just has to keep learning, especially in different spots, especially defensively.”

Purdue will ask a lot of Boudreaux defensively. When Haarms is out of the game, Boudreaux will have to try to keep centers out of the paint. When he is playing with Haarms, he’ll have to spend more time on the perimeter and deal with more athletic players. That means cutting off angles, positioning himself properly and being as physical as possible. He doesn’t believe that will be a problem, though, and neither do his new teammates, who have already seen how he plays with an edge.

“Once he gets going and gets his mind into the game and someone gets him upset, there’s really no stopping him,” sophomore guard Nojel Eastern says. “When he gets frustrated he plays really hard. He’s not trying to hurt anybody, but he steps up his level of play.”

Adds senior swingman Ryan Cline: “He comes in with a chip on a shoulder, and he’s a guy who just competes every day. He’s stronger than I think he knows.”

Painter says Boudreaux could start at power forward, but he also might play more center simply because of what he can do there offensively. One way or another, Boudreaux will be an integral piece on a Big Ten team looking to return to the NCAA Tournament, which is all he was hoping for when he decided to leave Dartmouth.

“So far,” Boudreaux says, “it’s been everything I wanted.”

(Top photo: Evan Boudreaux by Fred Kfoury III/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
"...no excuses - only results!”


 
 Page 3 of 3 ALL« First<123
Icon Legend Permissions Topic Options
Report Post

Quote Post

Quick Reply

Print Topic

Email Topic

6498 Views




Copyright © 2004-2012 Basketball U. Terms of Use for our Site and Privacy Policy are applicable to you. All rights reserved.
Basketball U. and its subsidiaries are not affiliated in any way with any NCAA athletic conference or member institution.
FusionBB™ Version 2.1 | ©2003-2007 InteractivePHP, Inc.
Execution time: 0.331 seconds.   Total Queries: 17   Zlib Compression is on.
All times are (GMT -0500) Eastern. Current time is 11:18 AM
Top