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Username Post: Ranking Next Year’s Recruits        (Topic#24223)
1LotteryPick1969 
PhD Student
Posts: 1783
1LotteryPick1969
Age: 69
Loc: Baltimore, Maryland
Reg: 11-21-04
04-11-20 06:31 AM - Post#306129    
    In response to mrjames

  • mrjames Said:
Both of those two players (and others in the Ivies like Wesley Saunders) spent a season playing a third or more of team minutes before their starring season. For Stephens and Saunders that was their freshman year, for Caruso, that was his sophomore year. Either way, none of those players went directly from not playing at all to starring the next season.

If we're thinking about odds of things happening, there would be good odds for MLL to follow the Caruso path next year and play 30-40% of team minutes and maybe even be a starter by the end of the year. The problem is, without Wang, Penn doesn't have that luxury to bring him along like that. And the odds of a guy going from playing not at all to being a productive, 75+% min player are slim. That's why I would have wanted to see some viable freshmen... just more lotto tickets to eat minutes productively.



I did not look up the minutes played, so I knew that might deflate my argument.

But to me, it's more about expectations. None of us who follow Princeton closely predicted stardom for Caruso or Stephens. Their minutes came as back-up. For the record, neither did coach Henderson expect what he got.

They shared a talent for making shots from about 10 feet or getting to the hoop, which may explain the lack of expectations, as scouts seem to have a scotoma for such a player. What scout ever said about a small player that "he's got a great 10 foot fade-away jump shot with a hand in his face"?

The comparison to Aririguzoh may be more apt. But I was not surprised. As with Maddox the talent was visible from day one.

I have not watched MLL live, so I have no personal opinion, but I tend to trust the eyes of the Penn faithful.

This gives me something to watch next season if I make it through the pandemic.

Off to the hospital.....

 
Naismith 
Freshman
Posts: 91

Loc: RI
Reg: 11-11-18
04-11-20 03:34 PM - Post#306139    
    In response to mrjames

Kinda relying on eyes, not stats at the sudden end of season. Harvard sweeps champion (and congrats to them) Yale, winning by 14 with a lineup missing Towns, Aiken, Juzang from the jinxed senior class plus Kirkwood a first team All-Ivy sophomore. Of the 10 rotation players in the finale,three freshmen score 18 points, 2 sophomores score 7, 2 juniors score 21, Their depth will be lethal again next year.

 
Tiger69 
Postdoc
Posts: 2474

Reg: 11-23-04
04-11-20 07:04 PM - Post#306141    
    In response to 1LotteryPick1969

1Lotterypick1969: From your posts over the years I concluded long ago that you are a Doc in Baltimore, my former home for more than 30 years. It is with great respect and humility that I wish you and all your patients well. Thank you as well as your many colleagues and staffs who are unselfishly helping us through this unprecedented in our lifetime pandemic.🐅

 
1LotteryPick1969 
PhD Student
Posts: 1783
1LotteryPick1969
Age: 69
Loc: Baltimore, Maryland
Reg: 11-21-04
04-11-20 08:11 PM - Post#306142    
    In response to Tiger69

Thanks. Truthfully, the nurses are the ones who are the going through MUCH more than the doctors. What happens to me, I can accept. It comes with the territory. Just trying not to infect my wife. So I am quarantined in the basement for now. Just hope there are no bats down here

 
weinhauers_ghost 
PhD Student
Posts: 1818

Age: 60
Loc: New York City
Reg: 12-14-09
04-11-20 09:21 PM - Post#306144    
    In response to 1LotteryPick1969

  • 1LotteryPick1969 Said:
Thanks. Truthfully, the nurses are the ones who are the going through MUCH more than the doctors. What happens to me, I can accept. It comes with the territory. Just trying not to infect my wife. So I am quarantined in the basement for now. Just hope there are no bats down here



I hope you get through this with no lasting ill effects. Hang in there.

 
mobrien 
Junior
Posts: 292

Loc: New York
Reg: 04-18-17
Ranking Next Year’s Recruits
04-11-20 10:33 PM - Post#306145    
    In response to 1LotteryPick1969

Hope you make it through this okay. My wife and I got it in mid-March—we managed to get tested before they really restricted things—and luckily only had mild cases. Although that's a relative term; there was still a day where it looked like we were going to have to go to the ER. Happy to say we're both pretty much fully recovered now.

Not sure I have any advice to offer that you don't already know, but if you have any questions, I'm happy to answer any you might have. Good luck!

 
1LotteryPick1969 
PhD Student
Posts: 1783
1LotteryPick1969
Age: 69
Loc: Baltimore, Maryland
Reg: 11-21-04
Re: anking Next Year’s Recruits
04-12-20 06:46 AM - Post#306146    
    In response to mobrien

  • mobrien Said:
Hope you make it through this okay. My wife and I got it in mid-March—we managed to get tested before they really restricted things—and luckily only had mild cases. Although that's a relative term; there was still a day where it looked like we were going to have to go to the ER.



Wow! Glad you recovered, glad no lingering sequelae!

Can I ask your age?

 
palestra38 
Professor
Posts: 24170

Reg: 11-21-04
Re: anking Next Year’s Recruits
04-12-20 07:59 AM - Post#306148    
    In response to 1LotteryPick1969

When the Ivy Tournament was cancelled, and it became quickly apparent that things were heading South in NYC, I drove up on the 16th to get my daughter, who was feeling under the weather. Sat her in the back seat, other side of my car and drove back to Philly. Got her tested---she was positive, but only had a headache and lost taste and smell for a while. Was able to get myself tested---negative. She's fine now and I am bunking with the family in Philadelphia. It's a bit weird, considering my daughters are 27 and 30(the older one is going to med school in the fall....I hope). Thankfully, we have a big house. My dog, however, is ecstatic to have them both at home.

 
Silver Maple 
Postdoc
Posts: 3567

Loc: Westfield, New Jersey
Reg: 11-23-04
04-12-20 10:22 AM - Post#306153    
    In response to palestra38

We brought our 29 year old daughter home from Manhattan a couple of weeks ago. She had self-quarantined for 14 days, and then pretty much stayed in her room for another 12 (until she couldn't stand it anymore). So far everybody's healthy. I keep reading that following a low carb diet to keep your blood sugar and insulin as low as possible may be key to minimizing symptoms should you become infected. As much as I'd like to believe that to be true, I suspect it's not quite that easy.

 
palestra38 
Professor
Posts: 24170

Reg: 11-21-04
04-12-20 11:25 AM - Post#306156    
    In response to Silver Maple

That's funny---I've been on a low carb diet since New Year's, so maybe that's why I have stayed clean.

 
cc66 
PhD Student
Posts: 1826

Reg: 10-09-09
04-12-20 11:33 AM - Post#306157    
    In response to Silver Maple

(From Brooklyn): this week, my wife and I have had it too, though thankfully, it seems to have been the mild version. After peaking at 101.5 with headaches and nausea last Sunday, we have been on a zig-zag, though generally upward swing ever since. My anecdotal advice would be to boost your immune system any way you can (garlic, vitamin D, B-1)and do some deep breathing exercises as a preventive measure. Yes, these practices will only work on the margins,but it is dangerous out there, and we need do whatever we can that might help.

 
Silver Maple 
Postdoc
Posts: 3567

Loc: Westfield, New Jersey
Reg: 11-23-04
04-12-20 12:51 PM - Post#306158    
    In response to cc66

I've been low carb for about three years (despite my doctor telling me that 'no one can stick to a low carb diet'), so it's not much of a change for me. The keto cognoscenti are all claiming low carb is the best way to strengthen your immune system. I admire their passion, but think they're probably a bit overenthusiastic.

 
mobrien 
Junior
Posts: 292

Loc: New York
Reg: 04-18-17
Re: anking Next Year’s Recruits
04-12-20 01:44 PM - Post#306159    
    In response to 1LotteryPick1969

I'm 35 and my wife is 31. For me, it started out with eye pain and muscle aches in my legs that later that night proceeded to a low-grade fever of 100.7. The shortness of breath started two days after that, and has only completely gone away in the last few days, over three weeks since onset. Except for the eye pain, my wife had similar symptoms, although she also had a bunch that I didn't: she lost her sense of smell and taste, almost completely lost her appetite, experienced some nausea, and just felt incredibly fatigued overall.

In our experience, this thing comes in waves. Our symptoms were bad the first four days, almost completely disappeared two days after that, but then came back, although not quite as bad, around Day Seven or Eight. Aside from the shortness of breath, I was all better by Day Ten or so.

If you have a pulse oximeter, it's about to become your new best friend—although a word of caution there. I saw a story in Stat that some doctors have noticed that covid-19 patients can often have blood oxygen levels that indicate they should be dead despite mostly feeling and doing fine; that was definitely true in my case. I'd get a lot of readings that would start in the low 90s and, after a few minutes, make their way up to 97 or 98. But this continued even after all my other symptoms were gone, and sometimes I'd get pretty terrible readings despite feeling like I was getting the normal amount of air. The worst I got started out at 74, 82, and 88. My college roommate, who's a doctor, thought that the oximeter had to be off, because this continued well past the point when all my other symptoms were gone, but I don't think it was. My wife, who got sick first and recovered sooner, was getting straight 98s once all her other symptoms were gone. It's only in the last few days that I've started getting completely normal blood oxygen levels right away. So I'd say an oximeter is a big help, but you have to combine it with how you feel to decide whether it's time to go in to the ER or not.

 
Silver Maple 
Postdoc
Posts: 3567

Loc: Westfield, New Jersey
Reg: 11-23-04
04-12-20 01:59 PM - Post#306160    
    In response to mobrien

I've heard from a couple of colleagues who had it that they generally felt OK during the day, but felt horrible at night. Was that your experience?


 
mobrien 
Junior
Posts: 292

Loc: New York
Reg: 04-18-17
04-12-20 03:58 PM - Post#306163    
    In response to Silver Maple

The fever would peak at night, but other than that, it generally wasn’t worse then for me.

My shortness of breath lasted longer than my wife’s, but her symptoms were worse than mine at the peak. There was a day where she briefly couldn’t even sit up or talk. I was getting all our stuff together to carry her the 5 minutes to the hospital when whatever it was passed and she started feeling a little better. Just an incredibly stressful time, because you read stories about people who seemed to be doing well and then suddenly crashed, and the infection itself comes in waves, so it can be hard to tell when you should go to the ER and when you shouldn’t. We live in Queens, so we were trying to avoid the hospitals as much as we could, and thankfully we didn’t have to go.

The muscle aches were the leading symptom for me. They were the first thing I noticed when I initially got sick, and they were the first thing that came back during my second wave.

 
Old Bear 
Postdoc
Posts: 3730

Reg: 11-23-04
04-12-20 08:01 PM - Post#306164    
    In response to mobrien

I have been content feeling sorry for myself and my family. Now you guys have ruined that for me. Thanks for waking me up.

 
OldBig5 
Junior
Posts: 264

Age: 62
Reg: 02-18-18
04-13-20 08:10 AM - Post#306165    
    In response to 1LotteryPick1969

  • 1LotteryPick1969 Said:
Thanks. Truthfully, the nurses are the ones who are the going through MUCH more than the doctors. What happens to me, I can accept. It comes with the territory. Just trying not to infect my wife. So I am quarantined in the basement for now. Just hope there are no bats down here


Thanks for your service.


 
1LotteryPick1969 
PhD Student
Posts: 1783
1LotteryPick1969
Age: 69
Loc: Baltimore, Maryland
Reg: 11-21-04
04-13-20 01:46 PM - Post#306190    
    In response to OldBig5

I'm not doing much. My specialty is outside infectious disease. Lot of docs, nurses, transport NOT wearing masks inside the hospital, which amazes me! So I wore an N95 and gloves all day, and now I'm in the basement for a week sleeping on the floor like I did back in college.

Thanks for all the personal anecdotes. I find them most interesting!

I've been keto for a while now--lost wt 225 down to 200. Really not hard, not hard to live with (especially if you go off keto for the weekend), and not "high fat" like people think.

 
Silver Maple 
Postdoc
Posts: 3567

Loc: Westfield, New Jersey
Reg: 11-23-04
Ranking Next Year’s Recruits
04-13-20 02:21 PM - Post#306192    
    In response to 1LotteryPick1969

You might not be high fat, but I am. I have totally embraced fat. Fat is my friend. I'm all about the fat. Fat is phat.

 
mbaprof 
Sophomore
Posts: 192

Age: 63
Reg: 12-24-11
04-13-20 03:06 PM - Post#306195    
    In response to weinhauers_ghost

He is in california with his high school host family, harvard player spencer friedman

 
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